Grassy Fork Twp AR

Redding Twp AR

Notice is hereby given that Jackson County, Indiana acting by and through its Board of Commissioners, will receive sealed bids at the Office of the Auditor, Jackson County Courthouse, Brownstown, Indiana, until 4:00 p.m. on Monday, March 19, for the 2018 Resurfacing Program.
At the hour of 9 a.m. local time on Tuesday, March 20, 2018, all bids for this work will be opened and read aloud in the Jackson County Annex
Bids shall be unit price for all work called for in the contract documents and submitted on the forms prescribed including and submitting on the forms prescribed including the State Board of Accounts For No. 96 (Revised 2009).
The bidder must file with their sealed bid, a certified check or bid bond in the amount equal to ten (10%) percent of the total bid, payable to the Jackson County Board of Commissioners. The above check or bid bond is to ensure the execution of the contract on which such bid is made.
The contractor to whom the work is awarded will be required to furnish, before commencing work, a performance, maintenance and payment bond in the amount equal to the bid price of the contract awarded to said contractor, and certificates of all insurance required by specifications.
The contract documents are on file for public inspection at:
Jackson County Highway Department
360 S Co. Rd. 25 E
Brownstown, IN 47220
A copy of the contract documents may be obtained bat the County Highway Department at no charge to the contractor. Any questions should be directed to Jerry Ault, County Highway Supervisor at 812-358-2226.
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The Jackson County Board of Commissioners will be accepting bids for one Tandem Axle Dump Truck and Snow Equipment.
Specifications for a Tandem Truck cab & chassis, dump bed, and snow equipment specifications are included in this bid package. Bids for truck and snow equipment will be bid separately. If you bid both truck and snow equipment, they must be listed as two separate bids.
Bids must be turned in to the Auditor’s Office by 4:00 p.m. on February 16, 2018 at 111 South Main Street in Brownstown, Indiana. Bids will be opened and read aloud in Commissioner Meeting on February 20, 2018 at 9:00 a.m.
Jackson County will trade in one tandem dump truck #14, with snow equipment: plow and spreader box.
Truck will be made available to bidders upon request at our office during regular business hours of 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Jackson County Highway Department
360 S Co. Rd. 25 E
Brownstown, IN 47220
Phone 812-358-2226
Fax: 812-358-0953
Please do not forget to list trade-in amount on truck bid sheet.
If you have any questions, please contact Jerry Ault at Highway Department
10% Bid Bond must be included with your sealed bid.
The following items must be included in sealed bid:
1. Completed Ford No. 95
2. Bid bond or check in the amount of 10% of the bid amount
3: Certificate of liability insurance
4. Bid Forms
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Local Postmaster Transitions To Retirement


Crothersville Postmaster Carolyn King will close her 37-year career with the local post office Friday. A reception honoring her will begin at 10 a.m. Friday, Feb. 2, in the post office lobby.



Carolyn King, Crothersville’s postmaster for nearly 20 years, will retire this Friday.
King began working at the local post office as a city carrier in December 1980 delivering mail and packages to homes in Crothersville. In 1985, she was elevated to clerk but still helped carry daily mail deliveries when needed.
In September 1998, she was named postmaster replacing the retiring Cheryl Trisler.
What will she miss about not being at the post office lobby window? “Oh, the customers,” she said. “The post office in a small town is a social place. An unofficial meeting area where friends share what has gone on in their lives. I will miss that friendly, caring atmosphere.”
While postal customers could conduct business at Crothersville beginning at 8 a.m. when she opened the roll-up door at the lobby window, King’s day always began at 6:30 a.m., when she’d sort, case, get mail ready for carriers to deliver before opening to the public.
There have been many changes with small town post offices over the past 20 years. Some post offices have closed; others, like Crothersville, are open fewer hours.
“Probably the biggest change I have been a part of is the implementation of automation,” said King. Prior to that it took two clerks an hour and a half to sort the mail for delivery. “Now it comes in from Indianapolis already sorted to carrier route and in the sequence it is to be delivered.” That’s the barcode—those tiny lines below an address or mailing label—that helps to get the mail delivered more efficiently.
Another change King observed is that the volume of mail—letters and flats— has decreased as more people receive and pay their bills—as well as read magazines and newspapers—online.
“But, because of the internet…specifically internet shopping… the number of packages we deliver has increased,” King said. “Amazon has been a good thing for the postal service.”
And because of the increase in package delivery, the post office is now a partner with UPS, a former competitor.
Her most memorable experience with the post office? King said shortly after becoming postmaster there was a wooden building—originally the old Lewis Lumber Company— just east of the post office across the alley that caught fire.
“The fire department worked at putting out the fire and kept spraying the post office with water to keep it from catching fire while we anxiously worked inside at preparing the mail for delivery,” said King. “Finally, the fire chief said that we needed to evacuate.”
“But we had all of this mail that had been partially sorted and we couldn’t just leave it in the building,” recalled King.
“Everybody pitched in and we started pulling all the mail, putting it in totes and placing it in our mail delivery vehicle. It took us 15 minutes to clear the post office of all the mail, get it into a the truck, and then we secured the vehicle offsite.”
“Before long the fire department gave us the ‘all clear’ and we brought the truck back to the post office, called in some substitute carriers to help re-case the mail. It was hectic but because everyone pitched in, it all got delivered that day just a little later than usual,” King said.
After that frenetic time, King said she stepped out to buy a soft drink. During her break, her supervisor, who had been notified of the fire emergency, called to see how things were going.
“The clerk who answered the phone told him, ‘Everything is fine. We’re delivering the mail. Carolyn is out getting a drink.’ He reportedly replied, ‘Well, I guess I can’t blame her’,” the postmaster said with a giggle.
What will she be doing in her new non-post office life?
“Oh, I have a lot of things to do at home that have always been placed on the back burner,” she said. But first, she may visit her parents and brother at their Florida homes as a transitional respite.
“I’m sure that there will be things to come up to occupy my time,” she said.
Troy Lovegrove, a North Vernon resident, who was a city carrier in Crothersville for a period of time, has been named Officer In Charge of the Crothersville Post office until a new postmaster is named.

Man Arrested For Theft Of Over $50,000 From Family’s Children

Indiana State Police arrested Larry L. Paul, 45, from Scottsburg, last Friday evening, after an arrest warrant was issued out of the Scott County Circuit Court. The arrest warrant was the result of an investigation by Detective David Makowsky from the Sellersburg State Police Post.
In June of 2017, Makowsky was assigned a case in which the Paul had allegedly stolen over $50,000 from two juvenile family members who were left in his custody after the death of the children’s parent. According to ISP Sgt. Jerry Goodin.
The investigation revealed Larry L. Paul, allegedly stole monies left to the children as part of the children’s inheritance from the death of their parent.
Paul was taken into custody and incarcerated at the Scott County Jail at 5:23 p.m., Jan. 26, charged with two counts of theft.

3 Bag Limit On Weekly Trash

Crothersville residents are reminded that Rumpke will only pick up three bags of trash from each residence during weekly trash pick up. The bags can be up to a 30 gallon size.
If you have more than three bags, you can purchase special tags for 75¢ each at Town Hall and attach them to each extra bag and Rumpke will pick those bags up, said clerk-treasurer Terry Richey.

Retirement Can Be A Good Thing

by Curt Kovener

The Times is losing another longtime colleague and friend. I had mixed emotions when told of Postmaster Carolyn King’s pending retirement this Friday.
She has been around having a hand at delivering your weekly newspaper as long as the Times has been in business. She started at the post office in December 1980 the same month the Times began publishing its first issue.
I will miss my friend and news deliverer colleague. I will miss her ever cheerful disposition. She could be having a really bad day, feeling ill, dealing with whatever family thing cropped up at home but you would never know if from her cheerful greeting when you entered the Crothersville Post Office doors.
Believe me, she knew when I was having one of those seemingly all too frequent bad days, and sought to bring a bit of sunshine and humor to try to improve my day.
Her retirement probably breaks a string of locally residing postmasters for Crothersville. When she and the Times began in 1980 Crothersville’s John Dorsey was the postmaster. When he became the postmaster in Brownstown, Crothersville native Cheryl Trisler became the postmaster. And when Cheryl retired in 1998, Carolyn was named the Officer In Charge before officially being named Crothersville Postmaster.
When she said she wasn’t sure what she would do in retirement, I pointed out that both of her preceding postmasters went on to other careers after postal retirement. That caused her to offer a hopeful smile.
I guess you could say that I am responsible for her being named the head of the local post office. Her competence and friendly customer service not withstanding, I wrote a letter of recommendation to her postal supervisor supporting her elevation to lead the local post office.
Well, me and a dozen or so other local businesses that sent letters of recommendation, that is.
Over the years, there have been challenges to how the post office does business with periodical class mail like the Times.
At first we turned in a hand written mail reports monthly making sure a check was delivered the first of each month leaving an account balance sufficient to deliver your Times. Then the postal supervisors said they wanted a report every week. Then they said they wanted the report computer generated using software that they approved. (No, they didn’t provide it, we had to buy it and pay for the updates.) And at one point a couple of postal auditors wanted to argue with the results of the required USPS certified software generated Times report. After two guys each spent six hours one day to find a 12¢ discrepancy, I could quickly figure why the post office was losing money. Fortunately, those guys are retired.
So retirement can be a good thing.
I am disappointed to report that Carolyn broke a mutual promise we made to one another in September 1998. When she was named Crothersville Postmaster—the person in charge of seeing that I abided by postal periodical regulations and seeing that you received your copy of the times each Wednesday—we privately agreed that we would retire together.
Oh well, the Times has outlived three postmasters’ tenure—a remarkable feat in today’s newspaper publishing world. I suppose we can break in a fourth one. But do one count on a fifth. At this stage of my unretired career, I will probably drink it.
For Carolyn, no more getting up at 5 a.m. to be in the office by 6:30. There’ll be spending more time with family in Florida, having more time to do what she wants to do rather than deal with and implement the latest USPS initiative: Retirement can be a good thing.